Let's talk safety

Storebought or Homemade: Tell Us!
Danl8
Posts: 723
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2014 7:50 am
Location: Chadds Ford, PA

Re: Let's talk safety

Post by Danl8 »

This is a really useful thread and should be made permanent on the site. I would love to read more about everyone's experience with safety: activities (the doing part) and mindfulness (thinking/awareness part).
Diane Kauffmds
Posts: 2847
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2014 8:13 pm

Re: Let's talk safety

Post by Diane Kauffmds »

I've changes this to a "sticky" for a while. There seems to be a lot of interest and we have several newbies.

Please feel free to add comments or safety suggestions!
Diane Kauffmann
Country Roads Guitars
countryroadsguitars@gmail.com
Bob Gleason
Posts: 344
Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2015 2:45 pm
Contact:

Re: Let's talk safety

Post by Bob Gleason »

Diane- Always interesting to see jigs. When you can. Take care.-Bob
Diane Kauffmds
Posts: 2847
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2014 8:13 pm

Re: Let's talk safety

Post by Diane Kauffmds »

Here is the jig I made for the little disc sander. It's designed to hood small stuff, like nut and saddle blanks. The other end provides control of other woods as I sand. After hurting the joint in one of my fingers, when the wood I was sanding suddenly bucked, I realized I needed something to keep my fingers away from the sander.

It's made of 1/8" plywood that was used for shipping stuff to me. I like to repurpose as much as possible. It's simply 2 pieces of plywood (~ 2 5/8" x 6") with a piece of waste spruce glued at the bottom, between the two (as wide as the plywood and ~ 3/8" wide). This forms a "U". About 2 1/4" from the top, I've inserted a wingnut, which serves to open and close the jig. There are 2 pieces of sandpaper the width of the jig and 1" wide, glued to each side of the opening, on the inside, to provide friction to hold stuff.

This works really well. It grabs even small things, and holds them very securely. I always use it to make nuts and saddles. It holds bone blanks perfectly to make nuts and saddles. You'll see the working end I'd shaped a bit. It got shaped naturally from cutting saddles and nuts. In hindsight, I'd go ahead and shape it just as it is. It facilities clamping and sanding really small pieces.

The plywood is very flexible.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Diane Kauffmann
Country Roads Guitars
countryroadsguitars@gmail.com
Bob Gleason
Posts: 344
Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2015 2:45 pm
Contact:

Re: Let's talk safety

Post by Bob Gleason »

Diane- Thanks. Bob
Diane Kauffmds
Posts: 2847
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2014 8:13 pm

Re: Let's talk safety

Post by Diane Kauffmds »

I went to a audiologist today. I have mild hearing loss, which isn't horrible. But I have chronic tinnitus that's very loud. I hear the ringing 24/; I'll need to wear hearing aids. The loss and tinnitus are from loud noise, like Saws, sanders, and shopvac.

Please wear hearing protection.
Diane Kauffmann
Country Roads Guitars
countryroadsguitars@gmail.com
tippie53
Posts: 6706
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 7:09 pm
Location: Hegins, Pa
Contact:

Re: Let's talk safety

Post by tippie53 »

yes tinnitus is a pain I have it for years aging and noise.

My safety tips

KEEP FINGER OUT OF SHARP STUFF

keep tools sharp
lighting
PAY ATTENTION
SANDER DO REMOVE SKIN

the loose nut in front of the tool is the most dangerous one

take your time

STAY SAFE
oh at least 10 cups of coffee
John Hall
Blues Creek Guitars Inc
Authorized CF Martin Repair Center
president of Association of Stringed Instrument Artisans
http://www.bluescreekguitars.com
Diane Kauffmds
Posts: 2847
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2014 8:13 pm

Re: Let's talk safety

Post by Diane Kauffmds »

Well, I used the Milescraft push block for the first time today. I needed to take off a little on the side of a fretboard blank. Man, I really love it! I was able to lower the tablesaw blade to the proper height for a 1/4" thick board. It had been high because of the safeties on it. I took off everything, leaving just the blade.

With the pushblock, there was no lifting or kickback. What really impressed me is how clean the cut side looks, hardly any tool marks. The side is very clean. The rubber or whatever they use on the bottom grips the wood beautifully. It was effortless.

I wish I had bought it years ago.
Diane Kauffmann
Country Roads Guitars
countryroadsguitars@gmail.com
Bob Gleason
Posts: 344
Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2015 2:45 pm
Contact:

Re: Let's talk safety

Post by Bob Gleason »

Too bad they don't make these things in 1/2" sections that could be snapped together for different widths. I'm always confronting a situation where the push block is too wide or too narrow.Now that I think about it, I believe I'll just make myself a fluffle of wooden rabbits in different widths. 100 grit on the contact surface should make them pretty grippy.
Diane Kauffmds
Posts: 2847
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2014 8:13 pm

Re: Let's talk safety

Post by Diane Kauffmds »

Bob Gleason wrote: Sat Jun 25, 2022 8:30 pm Too bad they don't make these things in 1/2" sections that could be snapped together for different widths. I'm always confronting a situation where the push block is too wide or too narrow.Now that I think about it, I believe I'll just make myself a fluffle of wooden rabbits in different widths. 100 grit on the contact surface should make them pretty grippy.
I don't know if this helps, but it comes with a third thin adjustable leaf, that can be installed. You may already be familiar with it. Here's a link with a review.

https://youtu.be/wqzlvdXCLl8
Diane Kauffmann
Country Roads Guitars
countryroadsguitars@gmail.com
Post Reply