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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 9:44 am 
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Keith Reilly wrote:
Didn't know I needed to figure out the scale length before the top was attached. I'd figure with a new bridge plate and bridge even if I had to move the position I would be able to without any problems. The neck is not attached to the body. I already steamed that out. Does that make a difference? Also the neck pocket definitely needs to be fixed up from the damage that occurred when I took it off.

My plan was to attach the top, fix the neck - set the neck angle, then measure out to where the bridge is supposed to be for the correct scale length. I figure it should be at or near the original bridge position. Is this not the best way to move forward? The top is not attached yet so if their is another method...


The scale length is determined by fret distance measurement, as you know. As long as the position hasn't shifted too much, you should be okay, assuming it was in the right position to begin with. I've found that manufacturers don't always put the bridge in the right place, so I determine the plate position, rather than relying on the manufacturer's original position.

You've probably already done the math, but determine the proper scale length by measuring from the nut to the center of fret 12, then multiply by 2; that's the real scale length. I haven't looked back to see if your guitar is a 12 or 14 fret model (14, I think). You can make your own measurements and do the math for the bridge, or simply go online and use a fret calculator, using the real scale length. Stewmac has one.

https://www.stewmac.com/FretCalculator.html

Use the calculator to determine your bridge plate position. They put the information at the bottom, in red. Just subtract the distance from the nut to fret 14 (or 12, if it's a 12 fret) from that number, and you can extrapolate the right position for the bridge plate.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 7:56 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2017 10:58 pm
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Okay I see what your saying now. I was going to measure out the scale length and not use the original bridge position, I just didn't anticipate it being that far off from original position. But better safe than sorry so I'll take the measurements in case I need to move the bridge plate while I can.

I got the kerfing all notched out. The guitar fits nice and it almost goes on perfectly. Their is a slight overhang I can feel in some places so that must mean in other places it doesn't quite go to the end of the body, but this is so subtle. I'm happy with it.

When I rebuilt the go-bar deck I did so with extra long rods. This was anticipating I'd use it to glue up the top to the body. Now with this MDF form I can't do that as it won't fit in. Can I just use weights to glue up the top? I've seen another method with some kind of rope or twine wrapping around the guitar. again with the MDF form I don't think that will work either. Need to find a solution for that.

The guitar is a 14 fret with a 25inch scale length. A zero fret guitar which is kind of rare. Thanks for the tip about the bridge plate placement. I'll take care of that as my next step.


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