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 Post subject: Heel and volute carving
PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 11:24 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2015 2:45 pm
Posts: 219
My favorite neck carving aid. Spectacular tool for carving the heel and for finessing the volute. Where ever applicable, carving tools that work are so much more satisfying to use than rasping or sanding tools. Perfectly sized for neck work and shaves wood across the grain with no problem. I don’t use it for the neck shaft, but what it does for the heel and volute make it worth having. Like all nice tools, it’s expensive. Made by Pfeil in Switzerland. Sold by Woodcraft, among others. —Bob


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:07 am 
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Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 8:03 am
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Location: Chestertown Maryland
I agree that is a good way to do the job, however at $83 that's a very expensive way to do it. My vintage C E Jennings was $10 at a garage sale, and here is a nice Bristol on ebay - on the first page that came up searching for "drawknife":

https://tinyurl.com/y39s3rq5

A drawknife is very easy to sharpen holding your stone in one hand and the tool along the inside of your other forearm.

Ed


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 10:36 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 7:09 pm
Posts: 5934
Location: Hegins, Pa
you would flip at how I do this
I got real comfortable doing it on my belt sander
I will be doing a video soon on it.

There are always differing ways to do things and I love seeing how others solve the same problem.
thanks for sharing
I have a few draw knives and they are a neat tool.

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John Hall
Blues Creek Guitars Inc
Authorized CF Martin Repair Center
president of Association of Stringed Instrument Artisans
http://www.bluescreekguitars.com


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2019 6:09 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 20, 2019 4:37 pm
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I would love to use a belt sander but I can't imagine how you control the dust.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2019 8:05 am 
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Location: Hegins, Pa
I use a floor model with a dust collector. I do love to watch a craftsman that is a master of tools. The man at martin used a few different draw knives and spoke shaves along with scrapers. A true master

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John Hall
Blues Creek Guitars Inc
Authorized CF Martin Repair Center
president of Association of Stringed Instrument Artisans
http://www.bluescreekguitars.com


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2019 10:09 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 20, 2019 4:37 pm
Posts: 8
A spokeshave is pretty easy to master and makes quick work of neck shaping without the dust. I would still like to try the sander one day. I'll have to move it outside.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2019 5:59 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 13, 2014 12:14 pm
Posts: 1191
i just put together a rather ragged version of this
https://www.popularwoodworking.com/amer ... ing-horse/
with the thought that it might assist in carving guitar necks. I have yet to try carving a guitar neck using it, but I may someday.

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When things are bad, try not to make them any worse, because it is quite likely they are bad enough already. - French Foreign Legion


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2019 7:28 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 8:03 am
Posts: 1117
Location: Chestertown Maryland
Maine

I have used a shave horse for chair parts - a great tool when you are doing things by eye and removing lots of mostly green wood. I think that it is not a precise enough tool for making a neck. Having tried a couple of ways, I like one of the 2X-material-turned-on-edge jigs as they let you get to all sides of the blank.

And a drawknife can be a little coarse for some of the steps on a neck. If you have all the tools, then you might try drawknife for gross wood removal, then spokeshave to get it very close, then rasp/file/scraper. You might use the drawknife for a minute or two, then the spokeshave for 5-10 minutes, then on from there.

Ed


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2019 8:28 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 13, 2014 12:14 pm
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Definitely -- when I've carved necks before, a drawknife has been useful for only the preliminary shaping. The shaving horse just gives you another way of holding the neck while you use whatever tool is appropriate at that stage of the operation (drawkknife, spokeshave, plane, rasp, whatever). Whether it will be a useful addition to my regular setup remains to be seen.

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Don't believe everything you know.
Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
When things are bad, try not to make them any worse, because it is quite likely they are bad enough already. - French Foreign Legion


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2019 2:45 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2015 2:45 pm
Posts: 219
When I posted the Pfeil drawknife, I knew I would get flack because of the price. I have 2 other vintage drawknives, but the Pfeil is exceptional to work with. As with all hand tool work, whatever works for you, works for you. Happy carving.


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