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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2016 2:35 pm 
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Just finished rough shaping the sides prior to bending. I shot a straight edge for the guitar top, then drew the profile onto my sides, adding 1/4" so I will have an extra 1/8" to play with when I have to shape them after bending. The extra 1/8 matches the extra I left on my blocks and might be a bit of overkill, but I don't trust my bandsaw skills and I'm not sure my profile is 100% right so I will just have to take my block plane to the sides a bit later on. Everything went relatively smooth. The only thing I need is something to make a long lasting visible line on the rosewood. It's very difficult to see any line I put on.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2016 8:48 pm 
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I've been bringing sides to final thickness and removing drum sander scratches with a card scraper. I've never used a card scraper before and had to learn from scratch. I bought one from Lee Valley and decided to try to make my own burnisher. I used an old 1/4 " tap I had laying around. I made a quick and dirty handle out of walnut and just threaded the tap into it. To tap steel I figure it needs to be very hard, and the finish on it was very smooth so I hoped it would be adequate. I also cut a slot at 90 degrees to a scrap of wood and wedged in an old file to file the edge square. I used this tutorial to get it ready and turn a burr [url]http://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/a_better_way_to_sharpen_scrapers
[/url]

Here are the results on one of the sides
Attachment:
P1020163.JPG


It actually works!

Attachment:
child so excited.png


It made beautiful thin curly shavings. It was quite nice and relaxing actually, I used my calipers to measure different spots along the sides to make sure that the thickness was correct all the way along. I could actually take a thousadth off at a time. I ended up at about .084-.087 along the sides


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2016 10:56 pm 
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When in doubt, it's a good plan to leave some extra. (Even when you're not in doubt, it's often a good plan to leave extra. You may still be wrong, even if you are sure you aren't!)

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Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2016 12:17 pm 
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Well, I'm definitely not planning on taking more off ;) But I figured that the sides needed to be the right thickness for bending. Somewhere I got the idea that .085 was ideal. Are you thinking I'm on the thin side? Too late now in any case, but It would be good to know.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2016 2:51 pm 
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Location: Saint Paul, MN
I bend mine at .075-.080.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2016 5:49 am 
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Carter, the luthier who is teaching me and keeping me from making too many dumb mistakes, recommended 0.085" when I did my latest sides.

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Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2016 11:14 am 
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You're lucky to have someone to help you. There is a guy within about an hours drive from here who I intend to go bug when it comes time to carve my braces. Hopefully he will accept some beers or a bottle of something in exchange for looking over my bracing and helping me decide on how far to take them down..


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2016 12:51 pm 
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I'm paying Carter for his time -- it's not free! But I do feel very fortunate to have his expertise available to me.

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Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2017 12:24 am 
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Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2015 9:43 pm
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Update time! I bent my sides. I made a hot pipe bending rig with a torch. In the picture there is a silicone mat from the grocery store to insulate the plywood from the heat of the pipe. This was a bad idea. It melted and burnt up in no time. Silicone is heat resistant, but I guess there is a limit. I replaced it with a few layers of aluminum foil and that worked way better. I practiced bending the sides using the offcuts from cutting a taper into them earlier. All in all it was a success, but I found it quite difficult, especially because I had trouble with some twisting. There is still a tweak or two to be done, and I am a bit nervous I will stuff it up now that I am so close, but that seems like the name of the game for alot of this stuff.

Attachment:
side bending rig.JPG


Attachment:
work area and sides.JPG


In the shot of the sides in my form, you can see I organized my work area and got some new tools. I bought a $50 bandsaw used which has been a royal pain in the arse but is still better than no bandsaw. I was given a #5 type 17? handplane that I de-rusted and am waiting on a new blade for. I got some Lee Valley backsaws. The rip and crosscut carcase saws. Hmm I'm sure some of the other stuff is new but I don't remember.

With the snazzy new tools, and looking ahead at cutting the dovetail mortise, I decided I needed to up my skills a bit. I took an afternoon class at the local Lee Valley in which we did the Gotshall block test which really helped my chiseling. I also decided to do a practice project to up my saw skills and did a dovetailed recipe box for my wife. I finished it with Tru-Oil to see how that experience went. Overall I'm quite happy, but there are a few flaws and things I would do different. The biggest thing is I used a random orbital sander to do final polish and sanded through in a couple places at the edges. I think If I tru-oil my guitar I'll definitely hand polish it.

Attachment:
dovetail box.JPG


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2017 12:39 am 
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My wife went away to her parents so I took advantage of the free time to make some radius dishes. I didn't intend to make them so soon, but it seemed like a good opportunity. I drew up a 25' and a 15' arc using a trick I read about in a book with three nails and two long rulers. I used these arcs to make rails for a router sled, and rigged it all up so the MDF disc could be rotated on a central dowel.

Attachment:
radius jig.JPG


It seemed to work great and I was very pleased until I got inside (I went outside in the snow to avoid the dust blizzard in my house) and measured the dishes' arc. I ended up with a 17' radius and a 19' radius! I was choked. I re-rigged the 15' arc and ran the router over it again. It turned out somewhere between 14 and 15 feet. The 19' radius I figured was too small and too close to the other dish, but in order to fix it, I would have to re layout and re cut the rails. I got a bit suspect of my hand drawn arcs, so I found a PDF online of a 28' radius and went to Staples to have it printed full size. I figured that if I was off 28' by a couple of feet it would still be ok. The morning I was making the new sled for the dish everything went wrong. My bandsaw blade broke so I went to a coping saw. Then the coping saw blade broke. When I finally got started routing, the base was not engaged properly and the router took a big gouge out of the dish. I ended up just taking and extra 3/16" off the whole thing to even it back out. I figure I'll either glue the two dishes back to back, or a put a backer piece on the thin one. With great anticipation I measured the radius of the dish... 31 feet! Something is hinky about my process to have so much variance, but I'm pretty happy with 31 feet. So now I have two radius dishes and need to find some sandpaper. I would love to find one big piece for each (I'm in Calgary AB Canada) but If I get impatient I might just use some peel and stick on a roll from Lee Valley and see how that goes. Next task is the dovetail mortise in my neck block. I'll be doing a few practice mortises for sure before I hit the nice mahogany!

Attachment:
radius dishes.JPG


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