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PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2016 12:12 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 8:03 am
Posts: 636
Location: Chestertown Maryland
A 110 is 6" long, but several Stanley's used the wheel for blade adjustment, notably the 102 - probably a copy of that.

Is there a chance that the #7 could be a Type 19? - After the war? They still used rosewood, but it had a gloppy colored finish to it. Look at the lateral for the word "STANLEY" If you have to tip your head sideways to read it, it is Type 16. If you can read the letters vertically from the front, it is Type 19 - 1948 to the early 60's.

I have a pristine lever cap to fit that - it is from a type 20 so the background in the logo is yellow and not orange. If you want it, it's yours for postage

By the way, Evaporust is pretty good stuff- non toxic and it is re-usable if you strain it. They just sold the company to someone and it is being offered under a different name like "iron magic".

Ed


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PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2016 12:55 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2008 8:06 pm
Posts: 2925
Location: Visalia, CA
The word Stanley does read along the length of the lever, left to right, or right to left??. Could you tell by the frog If I put up a pic of that?
Thanks for the offer of the cap, I'll consider it if I don't like how this one turns out. The orange japanning is still pretty good on it.

Yeah, I used the Evaporust on about 6 planes, then the stuff stopped working. I switched to the electrolysis method, which works really great, but will take off the japanning if there is rust underneath it. And of course I have naval jelly too!

So the 102 is the short plane? Okay probably what it is a copy of then. Which I could tell who made it.


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PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2016 1:18 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 8:03 am
Posts: 636
Location: Chestertown Maryland
You could check the frog yourself against the type study

I did electrolysis for about 15 years - very effective. However I have changed my approach in the last 10 years to one of saving as much patina as possible. It happened when I cleaned up a very nice Type 5 #6 - first lateral, 1885. When I finished it, it just looked too good. Now I use Evaporust as needed, but it is not often. As an example, on hand saws I use a razor blade to get 90%, then 400-600 grit emory paper on a block with WD-40 as a lubricant. If there is an etch at all, this will bring it up. On planes, steel wool and WD-40 after a razor blade where needed - this will leave the patina

Ed


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PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2016 2:17 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2008 8:06 pm
Posts: 2925
Location: Visalia, CA
I think I'm leaning that way as well. The last block plane I did I just wired off the rust. On a Stanley #4 I have that is pre 1900 I used evaporust but only cleaned up the sole to make sure it was flat, and I love that plane and how it looks. I might only use the electrolysis on the very worst cases.


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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2016 2:07 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2015 2:45 pm
Posts: 143
I have an old Bailey #8 with a corrugated sole that I've used to joint tops and backs for 40 years. Really a great plane. For some time I've been kind of wanting a second one, specifically a #8 with a flat sole. I actually had 1 once, but I gave it to my son when he started making instruments. Not being a vintage buff, I don't know much about the differences in #8's. You guys seem to be into the nuances. There is no such thing as finding an old plane here in Hawaii. Not like the Mainland, so I've been looking on eBay. Is there something specific that I should be looking for in the changes of #8's throughout the years that make 1 better than another? I just want another one that works, specifically on it's side, which is how I use it 90% of the time.


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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2016 3:59 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 7:09 pm
Posts: 5416
Location: Hegins, Pa
I have 3 different 8's all flat sole. I like the older bailey if you need one I can help you out

_________________
John Hall
Blues Creek Guitars Inc
Authorized CF Martin Repair Center
Board of Directors of Association of Stringed Instrument Artisans
http://www.bluescreekguitars.com


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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2016 4:25 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 8:03 am
Posts: 636
Location: Chestertown Maryland
I would take John up on his offer - he is also very good at shipping odd shaped stuff and that would be 1/2 the battle getting it to Hawaii. Hard to go wrong with any 8 because no cheap ones were made. A Sargent, a Stanley, a Millers Falls, any of them will do fine unless it is rusted enough to be pitted on the sole or on the blade where you need to sharpen. Something to look for if you are going to shoot (chute, shute) with one is to be sure the side you are resting it on is square with the sole. Check it and if it is out by any large amount, you could have a machinist square up that side.

Here is a simple handle that makes shooting easy:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ruby1638/ ... 379996680/

The outside piece is just a rectangle, the inner piece fits over the cheek, and the two inner pieces trap the front and back of the frog. The handle is just a piece of anything you like screwed into the bottom - mine is a dowel of boxwood and works fine with no fatique from using it. It fits all of the #5's I have tried it on, and it fits a #6 too.

Ed


Last edited by ruby@magpage.com on Sun May 29, 2016 9:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2016 8:52 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2015 2:45 pm
Posts: 143
Ed, Thanks for the reply. John and I are old friends. He's good at most everything he does, because he cares about things All too uncommon in today's world. We've been trading stuff for years. I figure, counting tops and backs on instruments I've made, student instruments, and repairs I've probably done more than 2,000 joints with my Bailey #8. Great tool. It is heavy enough that I don't find the need for any accessory handle, although I could see the usefulness of yours for smaller planes. I'm just in the mood for trying one with a flat sole rather than a corrugated sole. I doubt I will find any difference, but you know how it goes with tool acquisition syndrome.---Bob


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PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2016 6:36 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 7:09 pm
Posts: 5416
Location: Hegins, Pa
My Father was a wood worker , a trained cabinet maker and I learned the trade from him. I inherited his tools. One story he told me was after the war he went to school to learn cabinet making under the GI bill. On his first job we had all new shiny tools.
When he got to the job site all the old guys were telling him that he looked like a rube , only greenhorns have all new tools , experienced guys have tools that show they are experienced , so the traded tools and till the end of the day my POP was "experienced".
Of the old tools he got were a few hand planes a 9 1/2 block plane dated 09 and a millers falls jointer with corrigated sole an 8 and a few jack planes. I just set up the 8 and found a body of a bailey along with the 6's. My pop was a flea market scavenger and I found multiple pieces.
I will see Bob gets a flat sole

_________________
John Hall
Blues Creek Guitars Inc
Authorized CF Martin Repair Center
Board of Directors of Association of Stringed Instrument Artisans
http://www.bluescreekguitars.com


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2016 1:17 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2008 8:06 pm
Posts: 2925
Location: Visalia, CA
Very cool John. I'm sure my grandfather had a bunch of tools I'd love to have today, but he passed over 20 years ago and I have no idea what happened to his stuff.


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