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 Post subject: Dremel bits for inlay
PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 11:41 am 
Ok,

I'm sure this has been asked a thousand times but I was wondering what bits you are useing for inlays. I don't want to spend the big bucks for the stewmac downward spiral bits. I was wondering what you use and were to get them. I was hoping to just pick some up at a local hardware store or ebay.

Thanks,
Aaron


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 25, 2010 3:38 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 7:09 pm
Posts: 5420
Location: Hegins, Pa
http://bqtool.com/cart/index.php?cPath= ... 54cdddab21
I use 1/32 square end mills and if you call them you can order .020 . At the price there are about 1/3rd the cost of Stew Mac

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John Hall
Blues Creek Guitars Inc
Authorized CF Martin Repair Center
Board of Directors of Association of Stringed Instrument Artisans
http://www.bluescreekguitars.com


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 25, 2010 6:06 pm 
Correct me if I'm wrong but aren't those up cut bits? Down cut bits minimize tear-out risk which is why I prefer them. Upcuts work fine but there is a small risk of tear out especially when the bit gets dull.

This site has downcuts for about 1/2 the price of stewmac but they have a $50 minimum. http://www.precisebits.com/products/car ... 2flute.asp

There is also an ebay seller with a 5 piece set of downcuts from 1/8" - 1/32" for $59.95 plus shipping.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 6:45 am 
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Joined: Sat Sep 18, 2010 12:05 am
Posts: 131
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
tippie53 wrote:
http://bqtool.com/cart/index.php?cPath=22&osCsid=ba1c6cad3618af10c4ac6e54cdddab21
I use 1/32 square end mills and if you call them you can order .020 . At the price there are about 1/3rd the cost of Stew Mac


John,
Do you have a special collet for the .020 bits or do they have a .125" shank?
Got any free/discount shipping codes for BQTOOL? Their minimum shipping and handling charge is out of line for a few micro bits.

I have these .125" 2 flute endmills http://www.grizzly.com/products/1-1-2-Solid-Carbide-End-Mills-1-8-x-2-Flute/H0941
in my Grizzly shopping basket but have no idea what kind of cut they will give me. For $7.95 each along with all the other stuff I need it's worth a gamble.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 7:20 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 7:09 pm
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Location: Hegins, Pa
I do not use down cut bits . A downward cut pushes the chips down and into the work. At this price you can replace them when they get dull. David Nichols of Custom Pearl Inlay , CF Martin , Tracey Cox, they all use the up cuts . The most important thing is to use a sharp bit.

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John Hall
Blues Creek Guitars Inc
Authorized CF Martin Repair Center
Board of Directors of Association of Stringed Instrument Artisans
http://www.bluescreekguitars.com


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 7:34 am 
We (KMG) get our fine down spiral bits from a place called "Drill Bit City" you have to get to their commerical page or sometime Email them for availabilty -- very reasonable price. I've used the bit John recommends and the are excellent. However, I prefer the down spiral with the lower RPM of a router 16,000-23,000. I believe Johns air tool is over 60,000.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 2:24 pm 
kencierp wrote:
We (KMG) get our fine down spiral bits from a place called "Drill Bit City" you have to get to their commerical page or sometime Email them for availabilty -- very reasonable price. I've used the bit John recommends and the are excellent. However, I prefer the down spiral with the lower RPM of a router 16,000-23,000. I believe Johns air tool is over 60,000.



That is exactly how I do it. Down cut with lower RPM's. I find the lower RPM to be easier to control and makes me work a little slower/more carefully. A high speed tool is just too easy to "get away" and do a lot of damage very quickly. Low RPM's can't cut nearly as fast which can be a big deal if you slip! I like down cuts exactly because it pushes the debris down. That keeps the edge clean and any potential chipping gets pushed downward, not up which in turn minimizes the risk of a nasty tear out. I suppose with a high speed tool though, the chance of chipping or 'fuzzies' are minimized with a sharp bit.

The big positive in using up cuts is that they are much easier to find and usually are quite a bit cheaper.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 2:32 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 7:09 pm
Posts: 5420
Location: Hegins, Pa
I do use a pencil die grinders . One spins at 56000 rpm and the other at 70000 , this gives you more control and very clean cuts.

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John Hall
Blues Creek Guitars Inc
Authorized CF Martin Repair Center
Board of Directors of Association of Stringed Instrument Artisans
http://www.bluescreekguitars.com


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 8:38 pm 
Thank you all for your advice.

Aaron


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