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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 5:42 pm 
Hi guys ... not sure if this is the best forum for this question but I was wondering what sandpaper you guys would suggest I use on my 125mm orbital. I find the stuff I buy wears out very quickly and takes forever to remove small amounts of material.

I am looking for something that can remove material quickly while lasting a reasonable amount of time. Although the quantity of material removal is more important than the life of the paper.

cheers guys

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 6:01 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 03, 2009 9:25 am
Posts: 477
Location: Nacogdoches, Tx
I've never found paper that lasted long enough for me, especially going to the finer grits. I'd be interested if there was one that was head and shoulders over the rest.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 7:20 pm 
I really like the Klingspor stearated papers for the finer grits. Not sure how long they last compared to other good papers, though. For the coarser grits, I use Norton's good stearated papers in 180g and 220g. Those papers last longer than many others I have tried.

Ken


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 7:34 pm 
We use 'Gator" from our local "Auto Value" store -- good quality, good price and lasts as long as 3M or Norton.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 10:53 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 12:34 am
Posts: 608
Location: Wilmette, IL
I may be wrong, but I though using stearated papers was a no-no when it came to finishing...they have the potential to cause fisheyes? Again, I may have the wrong information.

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Ken Hundley
Nocturnal Guitars
http://www.nocturnalguitars.com

So, my big brother was playing guitar and I figured I'd try it too.
- Stevie Ray Vaughan


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 11:54 am 
With solvent finishes many producers actually recommend the stearated paper (soap release agent) However, Target for one warns against using coated paper with waterborne coatings. Personally I don't use the stearated paper -- never found a need, if the coating is properly dried it powders off nicely. And final level and polish is a wet sand operation.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 1:55 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 03, 2009 9:25 am
Posts: 477
Location: Nacogdoches, Tx
Is "stearated" paper identified as such in the packaging?
How do I know it from the non type?
Thanks


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 2:08 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 12:34 am
Posts: 608
Location: Wilmette, IL
Thanks, Ken, makes sense.

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Ken Hundley
Nocturnal Guitars
http://www.nocturnalguitars.com

So, my big brother was playing guitar and I figured I'd try it too.
- Stevie Ray Vaughan


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 2:23 pm 
I don't agree with the comments about stearated paper and water based lacquer, and I feel someone with experience using water based lacquer and stearated papers should chime in. I use waterborne lacquers (Target Coatings) exclusively. I have had zero issues using stearated paper. The last four guitars were done using stearated papers. Sometime ago, I called Jeff at Target and asked him specifically about stearated papers. He said as long as high quality papers are used, stearates are not a problem. He said issues surface with cheap, off brand, or no name papers that are just loaded with stearates. He told me to stick with the higher grade papers from name brands, and I would have no issues. Just as Jeff said, I have had no issues with Klingspor papers.

I know some like to wet sand, but I am not one of those. I use Klingspor stearated papers in 600 grit to 1200 grit to sand before polishing. They are a joy to work with when used dry. I don't have to worry about what lubricant to use for wet sanding (water is not a good medium for wet sanding water-based lacquer), I don't have to deal with the wet slurry mess, and most importantly, I can very easily see how much material I am removing and how level the finish is. We each develop a routine that works, and this one works incredibly well for me.

Regarding the coarser grits, I have used 3M's garnet sandpaper (no stearates) for years and still have sheets of it in my shop. That paper pales in comparison to Norton's 3X yellow premium aluminum oxide, which has stearates. A sheet of the Norton 3X 220 will cut faster, last much longer (especially with the oily woods we use), and barely clog compared to garnet unstearated paper. I have some of the Gator yellow premium sandpaper, which works well, but it also contains stearates.

Ken


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 7:03 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 03, 2009 9:25 am
Posts: 477
Location: Nacogdoches, Tx
My big tool store carries Gator brand, but they have aluminum oxide, silicone carbide, and zirconium oxide. Is one better than the other? I need probably from 120-220 grits because I have a bunch of other paper from before.
While just writing the sentences above, I went and found the papers I'd bought on my last kit from Peachtree Woodworking Supply. Turns out they're silicone carbide/aluminum oxide. Go figure. But I still like my question about which is better.
They have stearates, and they are Mirka/Norton brand.
I seem to remember them working very well for me. I got the wet/dry (only used dry) from 320 grit to 1500 grit.
By the way, they sell a micro-mesh kit that really blew me away last time. I used it after all my finishing and before my buffing supplies came in, and the guitar was looking good. Later I used it on the nut and the saddle, and both really came out very shiny and smooth. Not expensive at all, and comes with a flat semi-spongy sanding block that holds the cloth-backed mesh very well.
I also just went to some other forums after googling stearated sandpaper, and there are obviously differences of opinion there as in here, but the impression I got is that older stearated papers used zinc in them that may have caused the fisheye, but that the newer ones were using calcium stearates.
I'm using a Target finish too, so I'll do like Ken C.
Bob


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