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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:45 am 
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Posts: 565
Location: Pittsburgh PA suburbs
Danl8 wrote:
Good choice. Many gears can be annoying from a maintenance perspective...more to break or keep in order. However for climbing, you will be able to keep a consistent effort without having to overexert. I ride a 12-speed fuji which for Chester County PA is good enough. Shifting will take a little getting used to, esp. with 21 gears, but you will appreciate most of those when climbing. :-)


As long as a bike is serviced regularly and kept clean it should last a good long time. It's always a good idea to have an Allen set and a bottle of lubricant on hand. I'm told it's also a good idea to wash the bicycle regularly. I've ridden my 21 speed Trek 4900 (which was the "entry level hardtail mountain bike) for about 15 years on mostly all the original components (barring a switch to hybrid tire and admittedly its overdue for a major overhaul.)

BTW, technique also comes into play. I recommend toe cages or clips to keep your feet in contact with the pedals and allow you to exert continuous effort throughout the entire revolution of the pedal. You want both of your legs to share the load equally to minimize fatigue - and as a side benefit to forestall chafing and inflammation to your undercarriage. That being said, I'd get several pairs of padded biking shorts and gloves with gelled padding.

I'd also recommend getting either a Camelback or a couple of water bottle cages and good squeeze bottles. I learned my lesson the hard way by riding over 30 miles on a hot summer day with only a couple of stops for water along the way.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2018 4:34 pm 
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nkwak wrote:
Danl8 wrote:
Good choice. Many gears can be annoying from a maintenance perspective...more to break or keep in order. However for climbing, you will be able to keep a consistent effort without having to overexert. I ride a 12-speed fuji which for Chester County PA is good enough. Shifting will take a little getting used to, esp. with 21 gears, but you will appreciate most of those when climbing. :-)


As long as a bike is serviced regularly and kept clean it should last a good long time. It's always a good idea to have an Allen set and a bottle of lubricant on hand. I'm told it's also a good idea to wash the bicycle regularly. I've ridden my 21 speed Trek 4900 (which was the "entry level hardtail mountain bike) for about 15 years on mostly all the original components (barring a switch to hybrid tire and admittedly its overdue for a major overhaul.)

BTW, technique also comes into play. I recommend toe cages or clips to keep your feet in contact with the pedals and allow you to exert continuous effort throughout the entire revolution of the pedal. You want both of your legs to share the load equally to minimize fatigue - and as a side benefit to forestall chafing and inflammation to your undercarriage. That being said, I'd get several pairs of padded biking shorts and gloves with gelled padding.

I'd also recommend getting either a Camelback or a couple of water bottle cages and good squeeze bottles. I learned my lesson the hard way by riding over 30 miles on a hot summer day with only a couple of stops for water along the way.


Thank you! I'll do everything you suggest.

I made a huge mistake one day, by taking my 2 German Shepherds for a walk, one at a time. We had a very unusual, 100+ degree summer. I didn't realize how hot and dehydrated I had gotten on the way home with the second dog, until I started getting chills. We had just moved to Parkersburg and my husband had no idea of street names, nor could he run the GPS. I got home in time to start vomiting. I was very close to a heat stroke and it came on without a warning. I certainly don't intend on allowing that to happen again.

My helmet came today, as well as the lock. Now I need a bike and the stuff you listed.

Thanks again.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2018 10:48 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 13, 2010 9:55 pm
Posts: 565
Location: Pittsburgh PA suburbs
Diane Kauffmds wrote:
Thank you! I'll do everything you suggest.

I made a huge mistake one day, by taking my 2 German Shepherds for a walk, one at a time. We had a very unusual, 100+ degree summer. I didn't realize how hot and dehydrated I had gotten on the way home with the second dog, until I started getting chills. We had just moved to Parkersburg and my husband had no idea of street names, nor could he run the GPS. I got home in time to start vomiting. I was very close to a heat stroke and it came on without a warning. I certainly don't intend on allowing that to happen again.

My helmet came today, as well as the lock. Now I need a bike and the stuff you listed.

Thanks again.


You're welcome, Diane.

I had a similar experience to yours. Heat stroke is a scary thing. I hope that you spoke with your doctor to make sure that there are no repercussions.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2018 5:59 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2014 8:13 pm
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Quote:
You're welcome, Diane.

I had a similar experience to yours. Heat stroke is a scary thing. I hope that you spoke with your doctor to make sure that there are no repercussions.


Fortunately, I was fine. I ordered the padded gloves and pants, like you suggested. I also ordered a bike "basket" that's actually a canvas tote with 2 handles. It's more than adequate for a few water bottles.

I had ordered the toe clips, but I cancelled the order until I get the bike. I need to make sure that the pedals have the front screw holes, otherwise I need to get a set of pedals with attached clips.

I like the idea of the cages/clips. But, I also need to make sure I can get my feet out quickly if I stop fast. I know an eventual fall is probably inevitable. But, I have to be very careful. I have back problems that include a plate and an internal spine stimulator, with electrodes running up my spine.

I'm all set, thanks to you.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2018 12:57 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 13, 2010 9:55 pm
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Location: Pittsburgh PA suburbs
OK - I just have one or two more things. As I prefer to bicycle on trails and stay off streets, certain there are certain protocols that must be observed.

1: always announce when you are passing a pedestrian or slower bicyclist, rollerblader, child on a cycle, person walking a dog - basically anybody not looking at you and heading in the same general direction but at a lesser speed. Using a bell is one option but I prefer to call ahead "passing on your left" or "coming up on your left" from a safe distance before attempting to pass or overtake them.

2: many pedestrians are "situationally challenged" by headphones/earbuds, dogs, young children or just getting too involved in conversations. On one occasion I was attempting to pass a jogger wearing earbuds who chose that particular moment to blindly turn around without breaking stride and even though I'd called ahead as I attempted to pass on her left side I ended up in the ditch in an effort to avoid her. I now make it a point to keep my speed well under control not to startle anybody but with enough momentum that if a dog on a long leash attempts to give chase I will still have enough momentum to pick up speed and outpace him.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2018 11:51 pm 
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I'll keep all of that in mind. Thanks again!


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 08, 2018 9:50 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2018 12:56 am
Posts: 104
Do watch out for heat exhaustion. I had to rescue a friend who had an incident, halfway through a route he had done several times before without incident. I had to drive to his house to get his car (because it has the bicycle rack) and then go pick him up. And this was with a ride that was about 17 miles each way. I had to drive further to get his car than I did to actually get him with his car. All he did wrong was run out of water and keep going.

I guess the moral is, if you run out of water, don't keep going even if you think you're fine.

nkwak: the word I use for people consumed by their own personal shell is "world-deaf". They aren't hearing their environment any longer, whether because they physically can't (earbuds) or because they're focused (conversation). It doesn't matter how they achieved that state, the result is the same. They're not going to hear you until it's too late.

Internally geared hubs don't give you as many gear ratios and they cost more, but they're lower maintenance than the standard derailleur setup. That's why people who ride a lot might choose to use them, but I don't think you're going to be doing the PBP any time soon and those are the people internal geared hubs are really aimed at. Derailleurs are relatively cheap, but you have to fidget with them more. You probably don't have an issue with a little more fidgeting. You may even enjoy the work.

So yeah, I concur, the 21-speed should work fine. In the course of a book, I had a character choose an internal hub (a Speedhub) but in that case, it was on someone else's dime so she chose it specifically because it was expensive and would last forever (treated properly).


Last edited by Mal-2 on Sun Apr 08, 2018 11:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 08, 2018 11:13 pm 
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(double post deleted)


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 09, 2018 10:53 am 
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Thanks Mal-2. I'm disabled, so my riding will be round the neighborhood streets. The bike is an inexpensive model, but will be sufficient for my needs.

I took it out for a brief ride. It rides and gears smoothly. It seems like a nice bike for the price.


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