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Same glue for Harringbone purfling and plastic binding?
Author
Post
Stuart

Total Topics: 38
Total Posts: 76
Does it make any sense to put the harringbone purfling on first with Titebond (since its a wood ) and then after waiting a few hours for it to set, put the plastic binding on around it with Weld-on 16?

Sep 17, 06 | 4:41 pm
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
Stuart -- I glue them together, not as two steps -- using Weld-On. Works very well and you don't have to worry about trimming away the hardened squeeze-out from doing the purfling. It's not difficult to control and glue down both of them.

Here's the page on KitGuitarBuilder.com showing it, though a photo of the gluing of the two strips wasn't possible. All that glue really messes up a camera.

Bill

Sep 18, 06 | 5:31 am
John B

Total Topics: 15
Total Posts: 76
Is anyone familiar with Bond 527 adhesive? Would it be suitable for plastic bindings and purflings? I would like to avoid a special order from stewmac just for Weldon 16 if I can get something equivalent locally.. Are there any other alternatives to Weldon 16?
Thanks
John Butler

Dec 10, 06 | 11:26 am
John Mayes

Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 6
There is no need to do two steps. What you do is, after you get your herringbone bent, glue the plastic binding on by taking a small brush and lightly wiping acetone on the gluing side (insude) of the binding. Then use normal titebond to glue it. the acetone softens the binding and makes it to where the glue will adhere. We did it that way when I worked at bourgeois guitars. Did it for hundreds of guitars. you have to work in smaller sections though as the acetone will dry and the plastic will no longer be soft if you try to do a large chunk at once.

Dec 10, 06 | 4:00 pm
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
Unless the the Bond 527 instructions state that it can be used for PVC I would not use it. Boltron -- the plastic now used by most suppliers as bindings and inlays is a PVC plastic. If you decide to use acetone --- practice on something first -- it is a solvent capable of turning some plastics into a pile of glop in an instant. Also note that straight acetone will burn your brains out if not used prudently. (most all other solvent glues as well)!

Ken

www.kennethmichaelguitars.com

Dec 10, 06 | 4:17 pm
Herman

Total Topics: 38
Total Posts: 480
Maybe I didn't use the right glue (they won't ship weld-on outside the USA), but I wasn't very lucky with plastic binding on my first two kits. In the end I had to use superglue to fix it. It is difficult to scrape that dried squeeze-out of it. After that I decided to use only wooden strips for binding now. Better looking too I think.
But don't let me hold you back. The whole world uses plasics and maybe you have more luck.

Dec 11, 06 | 11:08 am
Freeman

Total Topics: 27
Total Posts: 668
I've used Ducco for plastic bindings. The fact that it sticks to the wood tells me it would probably work for the herringbone.

Dec 11, 06 | 11:49 am
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
Duco works good with wood, most/some plastics it does not work with PVC -- Boltaron. As Herman has found out it will fail. I have personally tested it using bindings from Martin and LMII -- Duco fails the bindings will de-laminate. Apparently the solvents in the Duco will not melt the PVC to create a Bond. The Martin GMC will even advise getting the Weld-on.

Ken


Dec 11, 06 | 12:58 pm
Freeman

Total Topics: 27
Total Posts: 668
Ken, any idea when to expect failure? I have a year on my triple ought and six months on my mandolin. The thought of redoing the binding on the mando isn't prettty.

Dec 11, 06 | 1:54 pm
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
Well here's the deal -- your bindings may not be the newer PVC material and may never fail. Also, the finish may act as a binder as well. I sure would not do anything. At one time Duco was the glue of choice. Before PVC I think?the plastic was an acetate. One of the things I heard was that the newer materials are less likely to shrink. I believe its the vinyl component that causes the problems. Even now some of the bindings sold are not Boltaron/PVC but most of the black is. The way I did my test was to laminate a few layers of bindings using the different glues and also gluing some of the material flat to a piece of spruce. After a couple of days I tried to pull apart the joints -- The Duco failed with almost no resistance. There was no melt/ burn in. This is enough to send up a red flag for me. The point I am trying to stress here is the same as my preaching about finishing practices -- don't do anything unless the manufacturer recommends it --- find out if the glue is suitable for vinyl/ PVC, if not do not use it. I m not a chemist or a risk taker.

Ken

Dec 11, 06 | 2:31 pm
Freeman

Total Topics: 27
Total Posts: 668
Actually, Ken, that is a great idea. I have some scraps of the binding left from both the guitar and mando - I'll glue some up with Ducco and see if I can pull 'em apart. Why didn't I think of that (duh)?

Freeman

Dec 12, 06 | 6:45 am


Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
What about Testors plastic model cement? It is advertised to bond plastic to plastic and plastic to wood. It contains Toluene, a fairly strong solvent. It is a very good glue BUT is it ok for Boltaron?

Aug 12, 07 | 4:38 pm


Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Let me asnswer this question myself. No.

Aug 13, 07 | 8:53 pm
jhowell

Total Topics: 37
Total Posts: 676
Cool! Not cool that it failed, but cool that you tried it. I try to do little experiments on small things before going at the actual guitar. What is working for me is something that I 70% figured out for myself and then found out the other 30% from the Factory Friday videos on the Taylor Guitar website.

I use CA on the first couple of inches and put on extra tape. I use LMII's FCA binding adhesive the rest of the way around with CA finishing up the last inch or so. The Taylor modification is to use CA on the interior (reverse) curve at the waist. This means padding on some shellac in the channel before starting as CA can stain spruce.

Aug 14, 07 | 3:10 pm



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