Deprecated: Function mysql_numrows() is deprecated in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 333

Deprecated: Function mysql_numrows() is deprecated in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 333
<br /> <b>Deprecated</b>: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in <b>/home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php</b> on line <b>236</b><br /> <br /> <b>Deprecated</b>: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in <b>/home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php</b> on line <b>236</b><br /> <br /> <b>Deprecated</b>: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in <b>/home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php</b> on line <b>236</b><br /> <br /> <b>Deprecated</b>: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in <b>/home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php</b> on line <b>236</b><br /> <br /> <b>Deprecated</b>: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in <b>/home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php</b> on line <b>236</b><br /> <br /> <b>Deprecated</b>: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in <b>/home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php</b> on line <b>236</b><br /> A hand with block planes

You are currently viewing Kit Guitar Forum archives. To view the current forums go to www.KitGuitarsForum.com/board



Log-in
Register
Members



Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236

Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/db/db.mysql.php on line 236
A hand with block planes
Author
Post
Jack Ellis

Total Topics: 4
Total Posts: 12
Hello

Im looking to buy my first block plane

Im after a tool which will last me a good 5 years at the least.

Im not entirely sure what i would use th etool for but im thinking of Levelling finger boards and lowering acoustic bridges.

I'm more of a repairer at the moment but am looking to get into building in the next year or 2.

Am I after a low angle plane or standard angle?

Do you guys think this is much use?
STANLEY BAILEY 9.1/2 BLOCK PLANE
eBay item link

any help or advise is appreciated


thanks

Jack

Jan 31, 10 | 2:39 pm
Running Dog

Total Topics: 1
Total Posts: 103
I foresee getting flamed in a big way for this, but here goes.

You can take the worst-made plane, lap the sole and frog, file the throat, replace the blade or at least do a good, complete sharpening (including flattening the back of the blade), and end up with a perfectly fine, usable tool.

Or you can buy a decent or better tool and make guitars.

Your time and money, your choice.

I don't know about the Stanley in the ebay listings -- it looks like a perfectly reasonable, inexpensive plane. It will, almost certainly, require the sort of set-up I mentioned. There are other, somewhat more expensive block planes from Lee Valley et al. They might be a better value and require less maintenance.

One of the first, best investments I made in tooling was a Lie-Neilsen low-angle block plane (http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?sku=102). I use it every day for a variety of chores, from binding leveling to brace shaping, to trimming the rim prior to sanding, even making final adjustments on the saddle. I've heard that when Tom Lie-Neilsen first made this plane, he called it "the luthier's plane." It's pretty much perfect for our needs.

Enjoy.
Rick

Jan 31, 10 | 4:41 pm
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
Ditto if you have the bucks!

Lie-Neilsen low-angle block plane

The key no matter what you decide is knowing how to use it properly, handling the plane so it stays sharp and only trying to sharpen the thing if you really know what your doing --- the blade can be damaged/ruined in an instant. $.02

Ken




Jan 31, 10 | 4:58 pm
Kevin Sjostrand

Total Topics: 84
Total Posts: 981
I would love to see a "How To" video on the proper use of a block and jack plane. I aquired 5 nice old planes, with sharpened blades, but I have never used one so I am fumbling around a bit trying to make them work.

Kevin

Jan 31, 10 | 5:19 pm
Jack Ellis

Total Topics: 4
Total Posts: 12
hmm ive gathered there's alot more to the hand plane then what it looks like...

Ive been advised before to go for a Lie Neilsen but im not sure if i have the money for one of those yet. Particularly as my sharpening skills are probably not worthy!

if a Lie Nielson was a 10/10 and a less than $10 was a 1/10 does anyone have any recommendations for perhaps a 6 or 7/10 grade low angle block plane?


Kevin - i hear what you say. I would love to see a video on that too. There's some great ones on youtube for sharpening but i havent looked for plane use and care yet.



thanks for the input so far

Jan 31, 10 | 6:30 pm
Running Dog

Total Topics: 1
Total Posts: 103
For plane use, check with your local woodworking stores. Rockler, near me, often has one-day clinics on various hand- and power- tools. Lie-Neilsen also has a traveling dog-and-pony show; check their website for info. I stopped at one near me recently, learned a bit and had fun.

For Jack's question, which I like a lot -- intelligently put! -- I was going to say Lee Valley and Veritas but their low-angle block is more expensive than the L-N. It appears that the Stanley and Footprint planes are the next step down unless you could find a used L-N or Veritas, perhaps through eBay or one of the used tool dealers.

And you'll do more sharpening, in all likelihood, with a less expensive plane. More set-up, more maintenance. But you need to learn to sharpen anyway!

Rick

Jan 31, 10 | 7:56 pm
Dan Denson

Total Topics: 1
Total Posts: 9
Hi Jack. I am new to guitar building, but I have been a woodworker for over fifteen years. I have a shop full of hand planes, but hands down my block plane sees the most use.

The other guys have given you very good suggestions.

My advice is to buy a Lie-Nielson or Veritas standard or low-angle block. If you absolutely can't do that, buy the oldest Stanley you can find and put an aftermarket blade on it.

Don't expect to save a lot of money by doing this.

Above all, learn to sharpen. You will be amazed at the difference a sharp cutter makes.

Dan

Feb 01, 10 | 6:40 am
llajoy

Total Topics: 6
Total Posts: 295
When I purchased my first planes, I grabbed the Buck Bros planes from Home Depot. I still can't get them to sharpen well enough to cut hardwood, so don't waste money on them.

I upgraded to the current version of Stanley Bailey planes about 5 years ago, and these sharpen nicely and work very well. I have the plane you link too, and the sole did not need much lapping. I also have the 10" smoothing and 14" jack plane. They all are really high quality. The blades are not as thick as the Lee Valley or Veritas, and the castings aren't as heavy. But they are good planes and an excellent buy.

I also have purchased some smaller planes and detail chisels from Lee Valley. The Lee Valley products come sharpened and honed, and can cut anything.

The Stanley Bailey tools are a good product and will give you years of quality usage, probably a lifetime. The Lee Valley and Veritas tools have thicker blades and will work better on end grain of hardwoods, but the cost is a lot different. About 3 - 5 times.

Unless you are on an unlimited budget, go with the Stanley Bailey plane. Spend the money you save on a good shapening book, honing guide and water stones. I would recommend John English's book - Woodworkers Guide to Sharpening. Lee Valley has various guides, and there are various good stones which can be ordered from most woodworking stores.

If you spend 150 - 200 on the plane, you'll still need to spend 150 - 200 for the honing guide and water stones.

Feb 02, 10 | 7:20 am
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
On the other hand -- I am not a wood working old timey purist, we have one small block plane in our some what hi-tech shop -- used mostly to round over bracing. For speed and accuracy most often an approriate power tool is where I'll spend our money.

Ken

Kenneth Michael Guitars est. 1978

Feb 02, 10 | 8:16 am
Kevin Sjostrand

Total Topics: 84
Total Posts: 981
I am mostly the same way, I will use my power tools when I can. I even started scalloping my braces, glued to the top, on my 2" wide belt sander, rather than carving.....I tried this after splitting an X brace with a "probably" not as sharp as it should have been chisel!
I am faced with two neck blanks cut from a block of mahogany. The fretboard surface will already be relatively flat, but the head stock (cut on a bandsaw) will need to be leveled and flattened. I think the best way is going to be a hand plane, but perhaps I could do most of it on my 4" wide belt sander.
Anyway, I do want to learn to use the planes, and sharpen them correctly.
One problem is practicing....what to practice on? I don't have chunks of mahogany lying around nor do I want to waste any, so that is a bit of a dilema. I am going to try and plane my joined spruce top down this week as it is at double thickness right now, but at the first sign of "trouble", I will get out the pnematic straight line sander, and do it that way....again.

Kevin

Feb 02, 10 | 9:38 am
Jack Ellis

Total Topics: 4
Total Posts: 12
Hello thanks everyone for the amazing input.


I just "won" this on eBay and picked up this for an extra 7 total of 34.84 for both.

Not bad I thought. Ill see what the condition of the iron is in the old plane but either way ill get to work on sharpening.

Made sure it was a Low angle, adjustable throat and a reputable brand. I heard stanley pretty much wrote the book on hand planes.

Does anyone recommend the "scary sharp" system? I found a good link here .

I'm looking forward to getting on with looking after this plane.
@Dan Denson - ill chuck an after market blade on as you say if it needs it and practice sharpening on which ever blade is worse quality!

@lljoy - Ill have a look for that book, thanks. i found some articles online which i've read briefly and there's that youtube video i found ^.

One of the better sharpening articles I found



I have a feeling buying tools is never going to end...

Thanks everyone

Jack

www.jacksinstrumentservices.com

Feb 02, 10 | 11:33 am
Ken C

Total Topics: 30
Total Posts: 554
Jack, spend a little time setting it up as Rick suggested, and it will be a great little plane. I have a couple of these Stanley low angle block planes I have used for years. I also have a nice Lie Nielson #3 bench plane and some older classic bench and jack planes. No doubt the LN planes are great. I love mine. But my little Stanley planes have done everything I have asked of them. It will give you years of service.

Ken

Feb 02, 10 | 2:15 pm
Kevin Sjostrand

Total Topics: 84
Total Posts: 981
Hey Ken C,
Will you come over and sharpen my plane blades for me???
Thanks, I'll put on the coffee.

Kevin

Feb 02, 10 | 2:50 pm
Dan Denson

Total Topics: 1
Total Posts: 9
Great deals, Jack. Hand tools are a slippery slope. Pretty soon you will be looking for any excuse to use them. The English made Stanleys are usually better quality than the recent USA's. The English have kept the hand tool traditions alive. There is a good chance you won't need to replace the cutters. Believe me, I have a lot more flea market Stanleys than Lee Valley or Lie-Nielson.

Kevin, I'd practice planing on softwoods. After all, your spruce top is a (very expensive) softwood. You can get a pine 2X4 pretty cheap at any Big Box and practice on that. Practice on all sides, including the end grain. Pine end grain is the standard test for sharpness. When you can get a curly shaving from end grain, it is sharp enough for your top. Get the plane sharp, tighten up the throat, and then set it for a very fine cut.

I realize top quality planes can be very expensive, and I don't usually spend the money for them. But as much as I use my block plane; it is one plane I wouldn't try to scimp on. Just my 2 cents.

Dan

Feb 02, 10 | 4:25 pm
Ken C

Total Topics: 30
Total Posts: 554
Kevin, are we even in the same state? I'm in Michigan.

For luthierie, I use my little Stanley block plane to remove extra height on the tail and neck blocks or rims prior to hitting with the radius bar. If I am putting a shim above the truss rod, I'll use the block plane to get the shim down close prior to finishing off with a sanding block. Handy little planes, but I wouldn't put one near a top or joint a long edge, the sole is too small and you risk gouging. That's a job for a smoothing plane. These planes with their really low cutting angle are designed for cleaning up end grain. Want to make the end of your headstock a little radiused? A few passes from the outer edges toward the center, and you are mostly there. Because they are small, I also find them great for working with smaller pieces and to put a radius along a straight edge, like say your upper transverse brace or back bracing. Or if you want to lower the peaks on some of your bracing, a couple of swipes with a block plane and you can be a 32nd or 64th lower. Yeah, I guess you could do it with sandpaper, but I like seeing the shavings curl up! I always have mine handy. Once I got going in this lutherie biz I picked up a couple of thumb planes. I use these a lot when bracing to remove material and add a camfer. Quicker than sandpaper and more enjoyable.

Have fun and as once mentioned above, practice on something that you don't mind gouging. Also develop a habit of identifying the grain direction and planing with the grain.

Ken

Feb 02, 10 | 7:47 pm
Ken Hundley

Total Topics: 40
Total Posts: 2169
The radiused bottom thumb planes are fantastic! I have the smallest one and use it all the time, though I think I would benefit from the larger ones. Maybe when I stop buying diapers for my kid.....

Feb 03, 10 | 7:56 am
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
This is it in a nutshell!

http://www.hocktools.com/sharpen.htm

Yes --- the sandpaper and glass methods works great.

Ken

Kenneth Michael Guitars est. 1978

Feb 05, 10 | 7:38 am
DonB

Total Topics: 20
Total Posts: 240
Hi Jack,
I use the old Stanley Baileys

Block Planes No.9 1/2 Low angle ($16), Smoothing plane No.3 ($36.00),
Bench Plane No. 4 & 5 ($42), Jack Plane No. 6 & 7 ($36-42.00).

I have some I haven't listed but I find these invaluable especially the No. 3 Stanley Bailey
Smoothing plane.

All bought on ebay.

This wooden plane I remade to suit my work for archtops and it fits better in my hand.


Good luck!

Don

Feb 06, 10 | 9:48 am
blues creek guitars Authorized Martin Repair Ctr

Total Topics: 52
Total Posts: 1011
I have been collecting planes a long time. Rick points out about truing the sole and sharpening . Most people overlook this step but it is worth the effort. A well set up plane is an almost effortless tool to use.
I do most of my work with power tools but a sharp plane is a very connective tool to your work.

John Hall
Blues Creek Guitars Inc.
Authorized CF Martin Repair Center

Feb 06, 10 | 4:03 pm
Jack Ellis

Total Topics: 4
Total Posts: 12
Managed to pick up a Stanley no4 Bailey bench plane too

ill have fun sharpening and restoring these two particularly as the bench plane is really rusty

Awesome input as usual - thanks everyone for your help

Feb 06, 10 | 5:00 pm
Adaboy

Total Topics: 64
Total Posts: 509
Didn't Stanley just re-release the Stanley Sweetheart planes? Here is the low angle block plane......but it's still $100.

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=22141&filter=planes

Feb 06, 10 | 6:16 pm
Adaboy

Total Topics: 64
Total Posts: 509
Here is a video of Todd Stock doing a presentation on chisel/plane sharpening to a group of luthiers. I think this was done at John Hall's place but I'm not sure. I learned a lot watching it.

Video 1 of 2:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_OZI_8k7h4&feature=channel

Video 2 of 2:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQEH-neQa9A

Feb 06, 10 | 6:25 pm
Gary Palmer of Palmer's Stringed Instruments

Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 65
Although I do much of my heavier work using power tools, hand tools (Planes, chisels, etc.) were where it all began for me and you can't beat a well set-up plane, chisel, saw, or scraper for material prep and fine finishing.

Regardless of whether you use Lie Nielson, Stanley or Record planes, it's always best to know how to prepare and maintain them. Good sharpening technique is a must.

I tend to use low angle block planes for a wide range of tasks, but find finger/violin planes serve best for brace shaving. An alternative to finger planes can be found if you search for mini/model maker's planes, as they're inexpensive enough for you to adapt to suit most given purposes. ;-)

Feb 08, 10 | 1:15 pm
Rick

Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 49
Rick and Ken (or anyone else),

You mention the Lie-Nielsen low angle block plane #102 as being a solid item. They also list a Model Maker's block Plane with a 12 degree blade angle. http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?grp=1307

Do you see any red flags on this one?

Thanks,
Rick

Feb 10, 10 | 10:37 am
Gary Palmer of Palmer's Stringed Instruments

Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 65
Palm/Modelmaker's planes are fine for smaller work, but much depends on their intended use.

At the end of the day, initially buying as good quality as possible typically tends to save money in the long run when tools are going to be used regularly, but choose carefully. Investing $ into tooling that may only be used on a couple of occasions can't truly be justified, as there's nothing worse than finding yourself tripping over tools you seldom/never use whilst thinking "If only".

Feb 11, 10 | 11:21 pm
Rick

Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 49
Hi Gary,

Thanks for the insight. Not being a wood worker I was wondering if the smaller plane might be better suited to the smaller work of braces and finer detail. I would seem that might not be the case. With the Stanley premium block planes at $99 for a replica of their older #9 1/2 or the low angle 60 1/2, the Lie-Nielsen 102 in iron is actually less ($95.) For $15 more you can get one in bronze for additonal weight.

The sure is a lot of stuff out there to read about antique planes and their modern replicas. Not sure if that is a good thing for me to be learning about! Hand tools are cool, old hand tools are even better!

Thanks again for the help,
Rick

Feb 13, 10 | 11:07 am
DonB

Total Topics: 20
Total Posts: 240
Hi Rick,
Here are four on ebay for a resonably price:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-Stanley-9-1-2-Block-Plane-Adjustable-V-Logo_W0QQitemZ270528093312QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item3efcbb1c80#ht_5656wt_846

http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-Stanley-9-1-2-Block-Plane-Adjustable-V-Logo_W0QQitemZ270528093312QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item3efcbb1c80#ht_5656wt_846

Here is a new one:
http://cgi.ebay.com/STANLEY-LOW-ANGLE-BLOCK-PLANE-12-960-6-NEW-20494_W0QQitemZ220373145141QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item334f435635#ht_2964wt_1143


http://cgi.ebay.com/Stanley-Bailey-Low-Angle-Block-Plane-New_W0QQitemZ230435680849QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item35a7097251#ht_500wt_1182

I prefer the adjustable throats on the 9 1/2.

Good luck!

Don

Feb 13, 10 | 11:49 am
DonB

Total Topics: 20
Total Posts: 240
Also, here are a few links I find helpful.

http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0a.html

http://www.toolnewz.com/HandTool_Basics/Handplane.html

http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_journal/woodworking/1273456.html

Best regards,

Don

Feb 13, 10 | 11:58 am
DonB

Total Topics: 20
Total Posts: 240
Some more links:

Restoring a handplane:
http://www.woodworkforums.com/archive/index.php/t-7724.html

Excellent book!
http://www.amazon.com/Handplane-Book-Garrett-Hack/dp/1561587125

Don

Feb 13, 10 | 12:06 pm
Rick

Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 49
Wow thanks Don! Some of those old 9 1/2s are a l to less than the new LNs. I had just been searchinng and watching them. Seems that many of them are fast approaching the new prices.

I have read and watched few videos on rehabing older planes. It looks like it might be a nice skill to learn. Especially getting the sharpening process down. That is something important no matter whatyou are building. I will look for the hand plane book today at the local library.

Good stuff.

Rick


Feb 13, 10 | 12:36 pm



Deprecated: Function eregi() is deprecated in /home/bluescreek/domains/kitguitars/pm/lib/member.fns.php on line 2298

You must be a registered and logged in member to post in this forum