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Probably a stupid Question.
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Post
Guitar Hack

Total Topics: 19
Total Posts: 41
I am nearly finished with my HD-28 Kit and have Target EM6000 on it. I need to let it set for 100 hours. When do I take the masking off? Do I take it off now or wait until the 100 hours is up or do I wait until I have buffed it out?

By the way thanks to everyone on this forum and John at Blues Creek Guitars for helping me avoid disaster a couple times and of course Bill Cory for this forum and also for his book . . . . . . . . and I'd like to thank the academy and my agent. . . . oops wrong forum.

Also another stupid question. I don't have a random Orbital sander but have an Orbital sander. Can I use it or should I get a Random Orbital Sander to be safe?

Sep 05, 09 | 1:45 pm
mike789166

Total Topics: 8
Total Posts: 41
I would take off the masking tape soon so it wont pull off the hardened finish and possibly flake. I would carefully cut around the tape first with a scalpel.
If you use a orbital sander you will get hundreds of tiny circles in your finish. It is best to use a random orbital sander. That is why the pros use them.
Good luck with what I consider the hardest part of guitar building.

Mike

Sep 06, 09 | 3:17 am
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
I agree with Mike.

Also, practice a lot with the RO Sander if you get one. Buy a known brand - not a Harbor Freight. ROs are better than a regular Orbital model, but they are not perfect and not foolproof.

Sep 06, 09 | 5:21 am
Tuneful

Total Topics: 3
Total Posts: 47
Bill, is this something specific to Harbor Freight RO sanders?

Because I've been using some Harbor Freight stuff recently that's doing a better job than I would have expected.
Including uses the tools were not intended for, like oversize abrasive disc with an adapter arbor on a rotary tool to debur granite.



Sep 06, 09 | 9:20 am
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
I have had "good luck? " with Harbor Freight stuff --- we use their tools for one off operations but certainly not in the higher volume production operations. For sanding I tend to go with Porter Cable tools -- as for RO sanders I have had Ryobi, Craftsman, Grizzly, and a few other name brands -- all failed after hitting the floor once. Apparently there is a balance rod that gets bent ---- and that is the end of vibration free service.

Also, I believe the RO Porter Cables have the fastest OPS and for finish work that is important.

Like I said perhaps it has something to do with luck -- but that has been my experience.

BTW -- the two Porter Cable palm style sanders are the only one's that have OPS fast enough for finish work (on wood) the others leave small circular scratches.

Ken

Kenneth Michael Guitars est. 1978

Sep 06, 09 | 10:35 am
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
Tune -- I base that opinion on a review I read two years ago on Random Orbit sanders. The testing results showed that Porter Cable was one of the best, and the adjustable rate model was their best. (I went and got me a Porter Cable.) Other brands that rated highly were similar. One was better than the pOrter Cable, but I can't remember what it was. They mentioned that they had tried some imported Chinese sanders and that the results were not worth reporting. (H-F power tools are imported from China.)

The problems with the RO sanders were that some had a more reliable plane of the large and small orbits, while others had something about them that made their tiny circles more apparent. If I can find the review, I will scan it and post it (it was in print); the results were very revealing.

I have seen this with the Porter Cable too, but only when I didn't go progressively through the grits as I should have. Once I learned that lesson, I never had another problem.

I haven't had many problems with other H-F tools.

Sep 06, 09 | 11:03 am
Tuneful

Total Topics: 3
Total Posts: 47
Well the part about the small circular scratches does resonate with me.
I got one of those great inlaid fretboards from inlaidartist off of ebay.
And let me tell you, other than the inlay tools, they must work with some really crappy tools.
This thing was just horribly finished. Small circular sanding marks across the inlay, the back had what must have been gouges from one seriously overdue blade change issue on their planer.
And although it was supposed to be a 16" radius, it's actually a 10" radius.

But after several months of sanding... ok, really just a couple of hours or so but it was seriously a mess, I got that fretboard to look pretty darn beautiful.
Stunning inlay, once it's polished up properly.


Sep 06, 09 | 1:02 pm
teeterfan

Total Topics: 1
Total Posts: 6
Hi. I am new to this forum and would like to share my findings. I have been refinishing guitars and automobiles for over thirty years, so this is all first hand stuff. Be VERY VERY careful with any power sander. Also stay at least a half inch away from any edge, period. Hand sand those areas carefully. Reason being, when the sander pad hits that edge the downward weight/force is concentrated on it and the sanding action is perhaps tripled. Easily the part of the instrument that "sand-throughs" occur most. My sanding approach may not be the quickest, but I consistently get great results and finishes that you can read a watch in. I use nothing courser than 1500 grit. I like to start by hand sanding with 1500 wrapped on a hard block of wood with very light pressure. Soft sanding blocks tend to conform to surface irregularities, thus more sanding is needed to even out the finish. This removes more of the finish, so "sand-throughs". Wipe and check the surface every 30 seconds or so. You wouldn't drive a car without looking at the road frequently. Good luck!!

Sep 08, 09 | 6:06 am
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
Teeterfan,

Welcome

The great Don Teeter?

Excellent advice !! Readers take note --- these are some of the "tricks" I learned at the Williams painting School here in Michigan. It cost me some $$$ but you are getting the advice for free! Good stuff and it will make a difference.

Ken

Sep 08, 09 | 6:25 am
teeterfan

Total Topics: 1
Total Posts: 6
Thanks for the welcome, Ken! Yup, I must have checked out both Teeter Books at the library a hundred times, so I had to tip my hat. This is a great forum which I look forward to exploring!

Sep 08, 09 | 9:14 am
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
Yeah --- I have owned the two volumes for a couple of decades. I also have mentioned Don Teeter on many occasions on this forum. The guy can really think outside the box --- for about the tenth time, in my view --- if serious about the hobby they are must reads.

Ken

Kenneth Michael Guitars est. 1978

Sep 08, 09 | 9:42 am
blues creek guitars Authorized Martin Repair Ctr

Total Topics: 52
Total Posts: 1011
Put me down with 1 PC and a Makita . I like the feel of the PC as it fits my hand very well.
John Hall
Blues Creek Guitars Inc.
Authorized CF Martin Repaircenter

Sep 13, 09 | 3:39 pm



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