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COMPLETE TRU-OIL PROCESS?
Author
Post
matthewrust

Total Topics: 20
Total Posts: 102
I have read tons and tons on finishing with Tru Oil, but haven't found anything that lays it out step by step. Here is my plan of attack and tell me if I need to revise it...

Finish sand to 400 grit, seal coat with shellac, fill pores with LMII microbead acrylic paste filler, another seal coat of shellac, then 20 or so applications of Tru Oil. Should I level sand and do one more application or just buff and wax the finish?

May 19, 09 | 6:31 pm
dviss

Total Topics: 18
Total Posts: 165
Have you seen this?:

Lmi's step by step process

May 20, 09 | 12:08 pm
matthewrust

Total Topics: 20
Total Posts: 102
Amazing. Thanks!

May 21, 09 | 4:32 am
matthewrust

Total Topics: 20
Total Posts: 102
Do most people 0000 steel wool the final finish or do they buff it out some other way? I don't expect a factory gloss, but I want it to be as glossy as possible...

May 21, 09 | 4:49 am
moocatdog

Total Topics: 35
Total Posts: 302
I achieved a very nice gloss finish by working my way up through the Micro-Mesh grits.

George :-)

May 21, 09 | 6:08 am
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
Matthew -- I totally agree with George. 0000 steel wook won't provide a scratch-free finish.

May 21, 09 | 7:04 am
matthewrust

Total Topics: 20
Total Posts: 102
So do 7 or 8 applications of the Tru Oil, then work my way up through the micro-mesh grits? What grit do I go up to?

May 22, 09 | 4:07 am
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
The range goes up to 12000. I go all the way up -- 2000, 2400, 3000, 3600, 4000, 6000, 8000, 12000. The 12000 is basically a polish.

May 22, 09 | 4:46 am
moocatdog

Total Topics: 35
Total Posts: 302
Matthew,
I'd recommend letting the final coat cure for at least a couple of weeks before final sanding/polishing. I had problems with a kind of flecked look appearing in the finish as I worked it smooth. After quite a bit of experimentation I found that using the plastic "steel" wool equivalents (000 & 0000) to uniformly "dull" the finish across all surfaces before using the Micro-Mesh led to the best looking results. It seems counterintuitive and I have no explanation for this, but that is what worked for me.

George :-)

May 22, 09 | 8:35 am
matthewrust

Total Topics: 20
Total Posts: 102
I may just buy the "beginner kit" of micro mesh from LMII and try that...

Would any liquid polishing compounds work instead?

May 24, 09 | 6:55 pm
Strat-o-file

Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 10
Hello,

On this same topic, I've recently worked on a couple of necks, and have gotten what appears to be "air" bubbles appear in the finish. I've tried to apply multiple this coats, but appearls to be happening mostly on the flat headstock portion of the neck. I've also tried T. O. on an all maple neck and actually experienced this on the fret board as well. I've been applying one coat per day, (allowing plenty of drying time) and once I've gotten three coats, hitting it with 0000 steel wool to smooth it down a bit before continuing on. Instead of using a brush, rag, or just bare finger, I've tried using those small hobby sponge applicators. Could I still be applying too thick, or should I scrap using the sponges?

May 26, 09 | 8:04 am
Strat-o-file

Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 10
Sorry in the second sentence, should read "multiple thin coats".

Thanks for any help / advice.

May 26, 09 | 8:05 am
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
I would get rid of the sponges. They are not the right tool for applying a quality finish and will almost always create bubbles. I've had better results using expensive brushes, but I've also gotten good results using blue lint-free shop towels ($2 per roll), folded to make a "brush"-type applicator.

May 26, 09 | 2:51 pm



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