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Handling and protecting the guitar during Tru Oil finishing process??
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jeremy3220

Total Topics: 29
Total Posts: 242
I'm going to seal with Zinsser Seal Coat shellac and finish with Tru Oil (plus stain the mahogany). It seems the problem with non spray finishes is that once you do one part of the body you can't just flip it over and do the other side.
How does everyone go about handling the guitar using a wipe on finish? Are you doing the top,back and sides in one session? I've thought about making a arm to attach to the mortise in the body so I can then clamp the arm to a table and have the guitar not touching anything.

I also wanted to know about how to protect the guitar once the wood has been finish sanded or when sanding between coats. I cringe thinking about flipping the guitar over and sanding the back while the soundboard is resting/sliding/grinding on some surface. Do you just use a soft carpet, blankets, or towels to rest it on? or what about some protective covering for the top?

Dec 03, 08 | 8:02 am
Kevin Sjostrand

Total Topics: 84
Total Posts: 981
Hey Jeremy,
I am not the expert here. I used Tru-Oil on my first and it did not turn out too great.....but that was because of me. I was not patient enough. I did sides, when dry did back, when dry, did sides again, and so forth. I did the top last by itself. You do need to be careful as even when dry the finish is still soft. I used clean towels to lay the guitar on. I think your holder idea is a good one, just beware of runs and sags as this stuff will do this even with fairly thin coats.
The Tru-Oil does impart a really nice warm semi-gloss finish. I had trouble with sanding through,even with 12 coats on, so my lesson learned if I use it again is to build it up more, and sand less.
Good luck.

Kevin

Dec 03, 08 | 11:39 am
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
Jeremy -- I'm not the expert either, but here's what I did.

I mounted my vise on a 2x6 and clamped it to my workbench, installed a 1x4 x 18" in the mortise, and put the handle in the vise. That kept the entire body off the surface; when I did lay it down, I put it on a soft old Tee shirt.

I padded the TruOil on the top, and let it dry for awhile (2-3 hours) so that it would not run. Then I flipped the body upside down (handle in the vise so the top would be held off the surface of the bench) and did the back. Then I walked away for a whole day, leaving the body suspended. WhenI came back, the TruOil was dry enough to do some between-coats sanding of the top with the back on the tee shirt, then flipping it. I did the sades basically the same way.

It worlked okay for me.

Bill

Dec 03, 08 | 1:54 pm
jeremy3220

Total Topics: 29
Total Posts: 242
Thanks guys, I'll see if I can make a handle.

Has anyone read LMI's instructions on truoil? They say to wipe it on then quickly wipe off all the access. This way it puts on a thin coat that dries fast. They say it should only take about 10-15 minutes to do the entire instrument, so I guess they do the entire thing in one session. They also recommend only using 3 to 4 coats instead of the 12-14 I've heard about on the forum. I guess I'll practice on scrap first to hammer out a plan but does anyone have any thoughts on LMI's instructions?

Dec 03, 08 | 3:52 pm
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
I've read LMI's instructions and they are more aligned with what Birchwood-Casey (distributor of TruOil) recommends for gunstocks. I think the thin coats are used on curving surfaces to avoid runs, etc., so it's a good technique from that standpoint.

I haven't ever done it that way, but there's no reason it wouldn't work. It would cure faster.

When I did mine, I only put on three coats.

There's an old thread here somewhere from over a year ago -- very detailed and long, specifically about TruOil. If you search for it, you might find it. Try TruOil, Tru-Oil, Tru Oil, etc. Everybody seems to spell it their own way.

Bill

Dec 03, 08 | 4:36 pm
jeremy3220

Total Topics: 29
Total Posts: 242
Thanks Bill. I've read through a lot of the threads and I'll try to read more and more before I finish. It's crazy how many Tru-Oil threads there are.

Dec 03, 08 | 5:14 pm
Ken Hundley

Total Topics: 40
Total Posts: 2169
Yeah, all those gun-happy nut jobs out there! ;)

Dec 03, 08 | 6:01 pm
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
Did ya ever wonder if criminals who use their guns in their work take care of them the way we sport shooters do?

Dec 04, 08 | 5:28 am
Ken Hundley

Total Topics: 40
Total Posts: 2169
Nah, half of them probably throw em in the river after they use them. Disposable tools.

Dec 04, 08 | 10:58 am
Ken Hundley

Total Topics: 40
Total Posts: 2169
Jeremy, your idea about an arm attaching to the neck block is an excellent idea. I have done it that way several times, and it works like a charm. Allows you to have access to all sides of the guitar free and clear, but the advice about thin coats is spot on.....you don't want to flip and run....especially if this is in your office, in a finished basement, over carpet, where you didn't lay a towel down cause, well, yer awesome at this...nevermind. Painful experience.

Dec 04, 08 | 11:00 am
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
Here is a preview from the KMG "Success Kit" finishing section. The arm detail is secured just like the neck. The guitar is locked in place with the cam action lever. Four rotations and the job (one coat) is done.







Ken

Kenneth Michael Guitars est. 1978

Dec 04, 08 | 12:18 pm
jeremy3220

Total Topics: 29
Total Posts: 242
Thanks for the pictures Ken, that's pretty much what I plan on building. How did you attach the bolts. I was thinking about just drilling and gluing in threaded rods.

Dec 04, 08 | 1:27 pm
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
The arm thingy is just like the KMG neck, it has threaded brass inserts.

Ken

Dec 04, 08 | 1:37 pm
deadedith

Total Topics: 34
Total Posts: 165
Jeremy - what process did you end up using, and how did it turn out?
Dave B

Mar 15, 10 | 4:08 pm
deadedith

Total Topics: 34
Total Posts: 165
Never mind....found you in the 'show us your guitar' section. Nicely done.
Dave B

Mar 15, 10 | 4:12 pm
mike789166

Total Topics: 8
Total Posts: 41
This is a quick method for holding the guitar

Apr 02, 10 | 4:38 am
Tony_in_NYC

Total Topics: 29
Total Posts: 448
Ken Cierp's method looks to be a touch more secure. Especially for finishing. ;-)

Apr 02, 10 | 6:14 am
longbow

Total Topics: 4
Total Posts: 74
Lets see you turn it to the side now.

Apr 02, 10 | 6:39 am
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
Sorry Mike but I also see that as a good way to also ruin a guitar.

$.02

Ken

Apr 02, 10 | 6:42 am
RayRay

Total Topics: 21
Total Posts: 190
Here's what I plan on using as soon as I get my shop finished:





Forced vent using a marine style bilge blower w/ 12V adapter....uses furnace filter and vents to the outside...light conduit to hold the body/neck or? to rotate..can be set up right oe left handed.
I have more pics if you are interested...post your E-mail so we don't overload the forum and I'll gladly share the info I have. :)

Apr 02, 10 | 7:50 am
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
That is "very cool" --- explosion proof bilge blower --- great idea. If the lighting was explosion proof as well and the power supply isolated this set up could be used with nitro.

I like it!

Thanks for some good ideas.

Ken

Kenneth Michael Guitars est. 1978

Apr 02, 10 | 7:59 am
RayRay

Total Topics: 21
Total Posts: 190
That's what I intended to do in the begining Ken, but I developed an alergic reaction to nitro, so that's out...but it still works well for other finishes. I like the idea of being able to close it up and protect the item from all kinds of hazzards along the way.... :)

Apr 02, 10 | 9:21 am



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