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Best book for Dovetail fit
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gouzos

Total Topics: 22
Total Posts: 47
I have Cumpiano's book which is full of insite but I would like to augment the knowledge with something else.
For one thing, I was really disappointed Cumpiano didn't explain dovetail construction more.

Apr 20, 08 | 5:46 pm
Jim_H

Total Topics: 27
Total Posts: 212
I can't offer a suggestion for a book, but if you haven't seen it, check out the 3rd Video in the "Martin Factory Tour" here. At about 5:15 seconds in, they show "Susan" fitting the neck to an Eric Clapton 0028EC. It's not instructional, but it does provide some nice visual detail for the process Martin uses in their production shop.



Apr 20, 08 | 10:50 pm
gouzos

Total Topics: 22
Total Posts: 47
I've seen that video and also one from Larrivee.
Both prepare the neck to fit just right without shims.
If it can be done, I would really like to do it that way and not the StewMac way. They suggest that you get it right and then use shims. I would rather keep it shim-free if I can.
That's what I am looking for.

Apr 21, 08 | 4:03 am
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
Gouzos -- I'm no expert, but youmight gain some insight from a page on my other website:Dovetail Joint no shims.

I might have just gotten lucky, but this worked fine.

Recently, I did another and used a 10 sanding block to fit it; it fits tight, too.

...

Apr 21, 08 | 4:55 am
gouzos

Total Topics: 22
Total Posts: 47
In the pic you seem to be sanding the tenon. Shouldn't you be sanding the cheeks of the neck?

Apr 22, 08 | 1:55 am
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
Gouz -- Yes, I am sanding the tenon, in order to fit the joint. To get the neck lower in the joint, the tenon must be reduced or the mortise enlarged; using a little block like this is one of the ways of doing it. In the right-hand photo, you can see a bit of chalk that was rubbed from the inside of the mortise. That is a high spot that needs to be sanded away. It took about 30 minutes for me to sand this tenon to the point where the neck went from 5/16" high to being even with the top.

If you check the link I provided above, you'll see me doing the same thing, but with sandpaper attached to a steel ruler. The whole process is shown in the link.

After the joint is fitted by sanding the tenon, the cheeks are sanded if necessary to fit the contour of the sides, but that is done by the "flossing" method (pulling a piece of sandpaper through with the neck noint held together manually) or by taping sandpaper to the sides and rubbing the neck's cheeks against it.

Apr 22, 08 | 4:03 am



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