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gluing on braces
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dcbaisden

Total Topics: 25
Total Posts: 58
What other options are there for gluing on braces other than using a go bar.
Thanks Dave
Waiting on my catalogue from stew mac should have it in a few days.

Mar 10, 07 | 12:41 pm
Ken Cierp

Total Topics: 58
Total Posts: 2262
Take a look at the books from Irving Sloane, David Russell Young and look at my site for the alternative to a radius dish. There a contour dish made from 3x5 cards! I now have vacuum presses -- but for manual gluing I prefer using cam clamps and the 3x5 trick. With the 3x5 method I can control the contour better (you can match the brace contour perfectly) And you don't have to deal with the braces sliding around and the frustration of the go bar deck losing tension because theres too much pressure on the top of the deck. When I did use a deck I found that a taller deck 36" to 40" made it a lot easier to work with because there was head room and no need to stoop over. I used 40" ash sticks. Anyway, deep throat cam clamps work well, I think John Hall sells a nice deep throat aluminum clamps that is also vry nice. If you can part with about $100 and have a compressor the vacuum table that I show on site is the way to go.

Ken

www.kennethmichaelguitars.com

Mar 10, 07 | 3:31 pm
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
Dave -- in the Stewmac instructions for both the Triple-O and Dreadnought, they show and tell how to glue the braces without the benefit of a GoBar deck, sanding dish, or any other apparatus.

I used their techniques for my first Triple-O and three years later I'm sill loving to play it (having just stared using DADGAD tuning on it for fun).

Stewmac's technique for gluing the radiused top braces (X-braces and transverse shoulder brace) does not use a radiused platform, but a flat one, for these radiused braces. They are glued to the top using a flat board. After that, the flat braces are glued in the same way. Works fine.

Their technique for the radiused back braces does use a caul, which can be made from a 2x2 or 2x4 easily. (On my first, I used a pine 2x4 and a wood rasp: Worked perfectly.) The caul can be used one brace at a time (which I did on the first), or multiple cauls can be made, and one can be used for each brace.

The techniques are shown in their video, and in their written instructions, which you said you had printed off in another post.

For the most part, guitar kits are set up for the home builder who doesn't have the money or plans to establish a complete shop: Stewmac is the best of the "big three" at helping you to build their kits well without a ton of experience or tools. Having built three of their kits, the first with practically no tools and the latter two with more tools (because I've become unreasonably addicted to guitar kits), I appreciate their approach and recommend it as the best "first kit" for any builder.

Bill

Mar 11, 07 | 4:42 pm
dcbaisden

Total Topics: 25
Total Posts: 58
Thanks Bill, ken.. I am just finishing up on a 7 day 12 hr stretch at work and will get some down time tommarow . I will review the instructions from stew-mack.
I plan on ordering my kit about the middle of next week .
i am just starting understand that there are several ways to construct a guitar.
My books will be here on the 19th. march.
With all that do you think I will need the instructions from stew-mac?
I am leaning toward the kit from Martin.
Thanks Dave

Mar 15, 07 | 12:33 pm
Dennis Weatherly

Total Topics: 73
Total Posts: 651
Dave, I am building a Martin kit as my first guitar. In addition to the minimal instructions with that kit, I am also using the following for reference:

Cumpiano's book
O'Brien's DVD (available from him or from LMI)
Stew-Macs instructions (downloaded from the web site)
000 plans from Pilgrim's Project (on eBay)
This forum (a LOT!)

I don't think you can have too much information. As you have already learned, there are lots of ways to build a guitar. Having several sources of information has made it easier for me to conceptualize each step as I work through the process.

Mar 15, 07 | 2:20 pm
dcbaisden

Total Topics: 25
Total Posts: 58
Thanks Dennis, I have the two book set Cumpiano/Kinkead comming from amazon .
From above it should have read video instructions from stew=mac.
Ill check out pilgrim project on ebay.
Im having a hard time deciding on which kit to buy.
Dave

Mar 15, 07 | 3:52 pm
Dennis Weatherly

Total Topics: 73
Total Posts: 651
I had a hard time deciding on a kit as well. Ultimately I went to John Hall at Blues Creek Guitars and talked with him about what kind of music I play, what I know I like and don't like, etc. From that he was able to make some recommendations and customize a Martin kit to get me what I really wanted.

Mar 15, 07 | 8:38 pm
Ken Hundley

Total Topics: 40
Total Posts: 2169
Ah Bill, DADGAD is a wonderful thing....think Kashmir by Led Zepplin, and if you are not familiar with Del Amitri, get yourself so and try Tell Her THis, a wonderful Irish Waltzy pop tune in Dadgad,. I don't sing it well at all, but people love to hear it, think its very cultural and are surprised when I tellm what it really is.

Anyway, the books listed above are great, but also get Some of the Dan Ehrliwine (sp?) books on guitar setup and repair, as well as finishing....they are excellent references. Look around at a lot of the blogs in the sigs on this site, as well as some of the more popular amteur guitar builders like Kathy Matsushita, a great resource. If you are getting all the information you need from books, then pick the kit that gives you the most comfort level, whether it be because of construction, price, or the ability to work with someone (John Hall or so) to get exactly what you want. You are going to run into difficulties with every kit out there your first time, whether it be a supplied difficulty as in Martin's lack of instructions, and other kits not quite so bent sides, or your own misunderstandings (WE ALL HAVE EM). Your resourcefulness is what gets you past these difficulties, and we here are one of your resources.

Get the kit, just get it, and start puttin some pictures up, and we'll all help ya through the rest of it. Good luck and have fun.

Mar 15, 07 | 10:09 pm
Bill Cory

Total Topics: 158
Total Posts: 3584
Dave -- regarding which kit to buy ... go read my head-to-head reviews of all the "Big 3" kits and their documentation on www.KitGuitarBuilder.com

Bill

www.KitGuitarBuilder.com
www.KitGuitarForum.com

Mar 16, 07 | 2:54 pm
dcbaisden

Total Topics: 25
Total Posts: 58
Thanks,
Bill I have read all your reviews and along with that I have done more research..
My books came today and I will spend the next couple days looking over what I need along with the kit.
I like the Martin kis only because of the larger scale. the stew-mac is a little shorter.
Does it really make any diffrence?
Ken, Thanks for the push.
Next week after I read these book and gain some knowledge I plan on giving John a call and talk to him about his -000-28 kit.
I have seen a few pictures of the finished kit and they are impressive.
Dave

Mar 17, 07 | 8:07 am
Dennis Weatherly

Total Topics: 73
Total Posts: 651
I posed the scale length question to Wade Hampton Miller, an active participant on the Acoustic Guitar forum and a person with a lot ofplaying experience on different instruments. For the kind of playing I wanted to do (rhythym guitar backing for a vocalist, playing in a contemporary church worship team, not much fingerstyle) he suggested a long-scale guitar. The main reason was that the longer scale has a little more string tension and seems to project better in an ensemble setting. Of course, he then suggested that I might want to consider a short-scale on my next guitar :-)

The other reason I went that route is I'm just not fond of the 12-fret body shape used on Stew-Mac's 000. I much prefer the shape of a 14-fret OM/000, as it seems more balanced to me.

Mar 17, 07 | 8:15 am
blues creek guitars Authorized Martin Repair Ctr

Total Topics: 52
Total Posts: 1011
Gluing is one of the most important parts of building and will be critical. I use a vacuum press but the gobar with the disks is a great way to start. You can shim with cards etc . As you go along on the hobby you will want to get more accutate with your work.
I use the disks for truing bracing and the top. I also glue my braces in them and use them as the cawls for gluing the top and back on. THey are such an important tool .
Use what you have the best that you can and as you grow in the hobby you will learn what you need. Imagination is one of the best tools you have
john hall
blues creek guitars

Mar 17, 07 | 3:53 pm



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